HInsurance -Brain study of shogi players reveals new insights into intuitive strategy decision-making

We often make strategic decisions intuitively – before evaluating all our options. For example, in games of strategy, players quickly adopt a stance of attack or defense. Exactly how this occurs, is not clear to brain researchers. Now, an imaging study of people playing the Japanese chess game shogi reveals some new clues about this intuitive strategy decision process. Researchers found that different regions of the brain separately encoded the values of offensive and defensive strategies as shogi players viewed different board layouts. In the journal Nature Neuroscience, researchers from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, describe how they discovered two different regions within the cingulate cortex region of the brain separately encoded the values of offensive and defensive strategies as shogi players viewed different board layouts. One region lies toward the front of the brain and the other towards the back. Senior author Dr. Keiji Tanaka, who leads the Cognitive Brain Mapping team at RIKEN, says:

Source: HInsurance -Brain study of shogi players reveals new insights into intuitive strategy decision-making